Tag Archives: supernatural

Books of wonder: reviewing Ice and Picnic at Hanging Rock

There are stupid ideas. And I had one. Why not review two genre-bending works of fiction, both by female British Commonwealth authors, both published in 1967? Won’t the comparisons be fun and informative? And so I sat down to read … Continue reading

Posted in Reading fiction, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

And we come to an end of riding the lightning bolt

Daphne’s no longer going to be forced into an arranged marriage with some pathetic demigod. Her sister Agatha isn’t going to be forced to divorce her husband and marry her father. All’s right with the world, eh? Well, there is … Continue reading

Posted in To Ride the Lightning Bolt, Uncategorized, Writing fiction | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Extreme emotional states in chapter 18 of To Ride the Lightning Bolt

Daphne Vane has never confronted a man pointing a gun at her before now. Then again, she just found out she’s one-quarter hell cat, not something that happens every day, either. Those two unprecedented events have an unprecedented outcome for … Continue reading

Posted in To Ride the Lightning Bolt, Writing fiction | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

Daphne deals with the nature of gods in chapter 17 of To Ride the Lightning Bolt

What do you do when an eight-foot tall alien prostrates herself in front of you and grabs your foot with her hand? This is not a question Daphne Vane had ever expected to be asked, let alone have it become … Continue reading

Posted in To Ride the Lightning Bolt, Writing fiction | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Daphne is beastly in chapter 16 of To Ride the Lightning Bolt

Daphne Vane literally had something happen to her for which there were no words. But even what could not be described still has devastating consequences. Daphne faces not just the ruin of her mission, but possibly the permanent loss of … Continue reading

Posted in To Ride the Lightning Bolt, Writing fiction | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Review: uncertain narrators in horror: novels by Hogg and Tryon

We tend to think of the unreliable narrator as a 20th century development. The unreliable narrator rejects the apparent objectivity of the omniscient narrator so beloved by the Victorians, warning us that all knowledge is subjective, all stories told from … Continue reading

Posted in Reading fiction, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daphne attacks! in chapter 12 of To Ride the Lightning Bolt

Daphne Vane is tired of getting pushed around. The Council, her mother, Enforcement, and now her doppelganger have been making of her life a misery. And all because she’s not the nice little goddess she should have been. Well, they’re … Continue reading

Posted in To Ride the Lightning Bolt, Writing fiction | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment